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AutoCAD Architecture

Attachment to AutoCAD

AutoCAD Architecture is a product of Autodesk. It is based on AutoCAD and is specifically designed for architects. The product is older, although the name has only been changed in recent years. Previously it was called AutoCAD ADT, which stood for Architectural Desktop.

In AutoCAD Architecture, objects called “components” were predefined. The components represent, for example, doors, windows, walls and rooms. With the associated property sets, a wealth of data can be maintained in the building components and custom values can be added. MV blocks display these as room stamps on the plan, for example.

DWG and IFC

Since AutoCAD Architecture is based on AutoCAD, it also uses its formats DWG and DXF.

Here’s a small history: Autodesk planned to offer the file format IFC in 2006. For ADT there was already a decent IFC interface from Inopso. This addon was developed over many years and was quite reliable. Negotiations with the company failed because the purchase became too expensive for Autodesk. It then developed its own IFC interface. We were excited about the first version but were quickly disillusioned. With small drawings without major special features, the IFC export worked. As soon as it progressed to real plans with more elaborate architectures, it began to exhibit regular crashes. It would take another 3 or 4 versions before IFC gained quality in AutoCAD Architecture and it could be used seriously.

Future

While sales numbers for Revit are going up, they are going down for AutoCAD Architecture. We are curious if it will still be on the market in 10 years. Nevertheless, while there are many users who like AutoCAD Architecture, Revit's strengths are obvious.

Our experience

For AutoCAD Architecture we have developed addons as well as a special CAD viewer and CAD editor for viewing and editing plans with components. This can be started independently of AutoCAD and embedded as a component in programs.